Oliver Laasch

Oliver Laasch
Oliver Laasch

Oliver is a Senior Lecturer in Entrepreneurship and Innovation at the University of Manchester, and an Adjunct Associate Professor of Strategy at the University of Nottingham Ningbo China. He previously filled academic full-time roles at, Steinbeis University Berlin (Germany), the Tecnologico de Monterrey (Mexico) and Seoul National University (South Korea) and visiting positions at the University of Tübingen’s Global Ethic Institute and at Copenhagen Business School. His research interest lies in alternative business models and in responsible management learning.

Oliver is a long-standing contributor to the United Nations Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME) initiative. He edits the responsible management education book collection; has coordinated UN working groups; and founded the Center for Responsible Management Education (CRME). Oliver is an associate editor of Academy of Management Learning and Education and has edited related special issues for the Journal of Business Ethics and for the Journal of Management Education. His textbook ‘Principles of Responsible Management’ was reviewed and commended in Academy of Management Learning and Education and he has co-edited the Research Handbook of Responsible Management as well as the SAGE Handbook of Responsible Management Learning and Education.

Oliver has worked extensively as coach and consultant with dozens of companies and universities. He also has designed and taught a variety of full courses on bachelor, master, PhD and executive education levels, including blended and massive open online courses such as the Coursera MOOC ‘Managing Responsibly’. Oliver mostly teaches responsible management, entrepreneurship, research philosophy, and research methods for doctoral students.

Oliver has been a follower of humanistic management research for a long time and taught humanistic management and humanistic business model courses. He has been collaborating for several years now in a multi-country (China, USA, Germany, India), multi-industry study on how ‘unrealistic humanistic management practices become real’. During this time he has experienced humanistic management practices first-hand and learnt from the people managing humanistically every day. Oliver is particularly excited about how a many humanistic management practices challenge the ‘mainstream’ logic of management, and about the management innovations emerging from this challenge.